Gluten-Free, Lactose-Free Dutch-Style Croquettes by Bill Wilkat 2018/12/29

Gluten-Free, Lactose-Free Dutch-Style Croquettes

Photo courtesy of Bryan Wilkat all rights reserved ©

Now anyone can enjoy these delicious croquettes using my gluten-free, lactose-free version.  I’ve prepared this posting strictly with that in mind. And, they can be made for vegetarians as well as vegans with minor changes (see below).

Click here for regular flour and milk recipe

Croquettes are popular in the Netherlands where I was born. My mom likely got her recipe from her mother which is typical in most families. For me, it’s a true comfort food and may be eaten as a main course, or as appetizers–but be forewarned, served as appetizers your guests may fill up on these before the main course!Tasty Links by Wp Tasty

Why are they so good?

I love croquettes and there are so many types you can make once you have the basic recipe. All you need to do after that is add your favourite ingredients whether they are vegetables or meats or seafood. Growing up my mom and dad both made them, and our favourite was chicken or turkey croquettes. I based my recipe on my mom’s but took it further by making them more nutritious. Easily done by adding lots of vegetables and to boost the flavour too. Original recipes usually had only meats added to them. Traditionally we always ate these with mustard, but they are great on their own as well. Or if you prefer, with catsup, mayo, etc.–what ever you desire!

Can I make them without meat?

You certainly can. Easily made as vegetarian croquettes by doing only vegetables and using vegetable broth. You can even go a step further and make them Vegan if you use an egg substitute. Frankly I’ve never tried using any egg substitutes so you’ll have to experiment on your own.  I’m certain it can be successfully done.

Making the Roux: The key of course is starting off with a roux, the French word for a floury paste traditionally made with butter. In this recipe we use lactose-free margarine. Butter sets up better than margarine when chilling. With that in mind, depending on how much you add to the mix when it comes to veggies and/or proteins, you may need to add more flour to thicken the roux as you go along. My golden rule is to follow my mother’s basic method: 3 tablespoons of flour, to every 3 tablespoons of margarine to start a batch. Quantity will vary depending on how large you make them, and how much meat or vegetables you add.

Note: We’ve had success using America’s Test Kitchen Gluten-Free flour, but there are other store-bought brands that I’m certain will work well. In fact we’ve made and tested them using an organic brand called Cuisine L’Angélique.  You might also try King Arthur GF Flour which we’ve used as well. There are numerous brands available now that should work out as well.

INGREDIENTS: (I usually double these amounts–except for optional ingredients–for one starter batch)

  • 3 Tbsp lactose-free margarine
  • 3 Tbsp Gluten-Free flour (see note above)
  • 1 Whole Egg
  • 1 Tsp Lemon juice
  • 1⁄2 Tsp Salt
  • Sprinkle pepper to taste
  • Liquids: 1⁄2 Cup of Almond Milk (or 1/4 cup mixed with 1/4 cup chicken broth) 
  • Gluten-Free bread crumbs as needed for coating
  • Egg and almond milk mixture for dipping as needed

Optional Ingredients for one starter batch, i.e. my favourite method:

  • 1 celery stalk finely chopped (about 1/8″)
  • 1 carrot finely chopped (about 1/8″)
  • 1 onion finely chopped (about 1/8″)

Note: Meat to Veggie ratio of 1 : 1 usually works best

INSTRUCTIONS:

Watch Video

  • Over medium heat in large pot, melt margarine, stir in flour & seasonings and cook for about 3 minutes, stirring constantly. Once mixture begins to bubble, add all liquid ingredients gradually & stir until sauce is smooth thick (add egg see tip 4 below). Remove from heat. 
  • For more flavour add: Parsley, finely chopped celery, onion, carrot, red, or green pepper, paprika, cayenne pepper, or curry powder (yellow not the hot red spiced one). Optional finely chopped mushrooms can boost the flavour as well. 

Check Out CreativeLive’s Free On-Air Classes 

  • If adding protein (i.e. chicken, turkey, beef, etc.) I suggest no more than 2 cups chopped–no larger than 1/8′′(3 mm) per batch. Mix well, chill till firm, shape, dip in egg mixture, and roll in bread crumbs (seasoned bread crumbs optional), and fry in hot oil (300 to 350 F) until golden brown. Set on paper towel to cool. 
  • I used to only make these using the mixture with the milk, but now I add the soup stock as well for more flavour (50% milk 50% soup stock/broth works well). 

Tips: 

1) Chop veggies small–no larger than 1/8′′ (3 mm) as that works best–and pre- cook them in a skillet with some olive oil before adding them to the roux—have this all ready before starting the roux mixture.

2) Chop proteins before starting the roux. Left over turkey or chicken may be boiled to make the broth and will yield more meat once picked off the bones.

3) Add more flour is mixture if too thin—you want a mix with a consistency of mortar—keep over heat while adding flour to ensure it’s cooked. If too thick, add a little milk or broth to thin out. 

4) When adding the egg, temper it with a bit of warm almond milk (or broth) mixing them together and gradually pour into the roux while stirring continuously to ensure it does not turn into scrambled eggs.

5) When adding veggies, 1 cup to 1⁄2 cup chopped meat is a good ratio to use.

6) You can use any type of meat just be sure to chop it small because larger pieces will poke through when forming them. 

7) Spread the mixture on to a cookie sheet to a thickness of about 1/2′′ (12 mm) to chill. Chill in the freezer for about 45 minutes to an hour before forming, dipping and coating with bread crumbs. No flour is required for coating them, just dip in the egg/milk mixture and then into the bread crumbs. 

Clearance Sale - Up to 70% Off. We repeat: Up to 70% Off kits & supplies. It’s our last sale of the year - and the savings are huge! Shop at Craftsy.com 12/27 - 12/31/18.

8) If you have a lot of meat or veggies to add, consider doubling the roux mixture. The number of croquettes you make will depend on the size and shape you choose–they may be made oblong or round.

9) Wetting your hands prior to shaping helps to keep the mixture from sticking to your fingers, so do this periodically. If the mixture is not chilled enough, it will be difficult to shape them. 

Notes:

You can freeze these, and we find it best to freeze them uncooked, on a baking sheet with wax or parchment paper. Once frozen, transfer them into freezer bags or vacuum seal them. Thaw them on paper towel covered with clear wrap before deep-frying. They may be fried and then frozen, but re-heating is tricky afterward, and they will not taste as good. 

© Bryan Wilkat
Print

Gluten-Free, Lactose-Free Dutch-Style Croquettes by Bill Wilkat 2018/12/29

Croquettes are popular in the Netherlands where I was born. A true comfort food–may be eaten as a main course, or as appetizers–but be forewarned, served as appetizers your guests may fill up on these before the main course!

  • Author: Bill Wilkat

Ingredients

I usually double these amounts–except the optional ingredients–for one starter batch

  • 3 Tbsp lactose-free margarine
  • 3 Tbsp Gluten-Free flour (see note above)
  • 1 Whole Egg
  • 1 Tsp Lemon juice
  • 1⁄2 Tsp Salt
  • Sprinkle pepper to taste
  • Liquids: 1⁄2 Cup of Almond Milk (or 1/4 cup mixed with 1/4 cup chicken broth)
  • Gluten-Free bread crumbs as needed for coating
  • Egg and almond milk mixture for dipping as needed

Optional Ingredients for one starter batch, i.e. my favourite method:

  • 1 celery stalk finely chopped (about 1/8″)
  • 1 carrot finely chopped (about 1/8″)
  • 1 onion finely chopped (about 1/8″)

Instructions

  • Watch video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEprCjCL88E
  • Over medium heat in large pot, melt margarine, stir in flour & seasonings and cook for about 3 minutes, stirring constantly. Once mixture begins to bubble, add all liquid ingredients gradually & stir until sauce is smooth thick (add egg see tip 4 below). Remove from heat.
  • For more flavour add: Parsley, finely chopped celery, onion, carrot, red, or green pepper, paprika, cayenne pepper, or curry powder (yellow not the hot red spiced one). Optional finely chopped mushrooms can boost the flavour as well.
  • If adding protein (i.e. chicken, turkey, beef, etc.) I suggest no more than 2 cups chopped–no larger than 1/8′′(3 mm) per batch. Mix well, chill till firm, shape, dip in egg mixture, and roll in bread crumbs (seasoned bread crumbs optional), and fry in hot oil (300 to 350 F) until golden brown. Set on paper towel to cool.
  • I used to only make these using the mixture with the milk, but now I add the soup stock as well for more flavour (50% milk 50% soup stock/broth works well).
  • Tips:

1) Chop veggies small–no larger than 1/8′′ (3 mm) as that works best–and pre- cook them in a skillet with some olive oil before adding them to the roux—have this all ready before starting the roux mixture.

2) Chop proteins before starting the roux. Left over turkey or chicken maybe boiled to make the broth and will yield more meat once picked off the bones.

3) Add more flour is mixture if too thin—you want a mix with a consistency of mortar—keep over heat while adding flour to ensure it’s cooked. If too thick, add a little milk or broth to thin out.

4) When adding the egg, temper it with a bit of warm almond milk (or broth) mixing them together and gradually pour into the roux while stirring continuously to ensure it does not turn into scrambled eggs.

5) When adding veggies, 1 cup to 1⁄2 cup chopped meat is a good ratio to use.

6) You can use any type of meat just be sure to chop it small because larger pieces will poke through when forming them.

7) Spread the mixture on to a cookie sheet to a thickness of about 1/2′′ (12 mm) to chill. Chill in the freezer for about 45 minutes to an hour before forming, dipping and coating with bread crumbs. No flour is required for coating them, just dip in the egg/milk mixture and then into the bread crumbs.

8) If you have a lot of meat or veggies to add, consider doubling the roux mixture. The number of croquettes you make will depend on the size and shape you choose–they may be made oblong or round.

9) Wetting your hands prior to shaping helps to keep the mixture from sticking to your fingers, so do this periodically. If the mixture is not chilled enough, it will be difficult to shape them.

Notes

  • Meat to Veggie ratio of 1 : 1 usually works best
  • You can freeze these, and we find it best to freeze them uncooked, on a baking sheet with wax or parchment paper. Once frozen, transfer them into freezer bags or vacuum seal them. Thaw them on paper towel covered with clear wrap before deep-frying. They may be fried and then frozen, but re-heating is tricky afterward, and they will not taste as good.

Keywords: Gluten-Free Lactose-Free Vegetarian Vegan Dutch Style Croquettes

Recipe Card powered by

Author: Bill Wilkat

Retired Luthier, and now a blogger writing about food including recipes, restaurant and product reviews, and guitar related information which includes "how-to" info. and more.